News

News and Announcements


January 22, 2013
School Age Parent Questionnaire

The School Age program has been selected to participate in a pilot program called the ASQ Initiative (After School Quality) presented by the National Institute on Out-of-School Time at the Wellesley Centers for Women (NIOST).

It is an after school program assessment system. It is our hope to evaluate our program based on input from families, students, and staff so we can offer the best programs that fit our community needs. Updates on the progress will be shared by the committee once data is collected. (Committee members: Bob Kaufmann, Cyndy Clarke, Joan Sweeney, Melissa Begley, Jeremy Cooper, Andrea Rush, Joey Rush, and Connor Rush)

On Monday, February 25th, Andrea Rush will be set up outside the Wise Guy room from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm to ask for your cooperation in completing a parent questionnaire. We ask that you take a few minutes of your time to complete the form before picking up your child.  We prefer that you complete the form while here at the center.  However, if it is easier for you, you can complete it out at your convenience and bring into the center by Thursday, February 28th.

Your child started to do their questionnaire, Wednesday, February 20th after school.  

A hard copy of the questionnaire is also available; please ask your child's teacher and they can give you a questionnaire to complete before getting your child.

We appreciate your commitment to our center. Your input is valued.


January 23, 2013
Registration for Kindergarten
Area school districts have posted their registration dates for children entering Kindergarten for the 2013-2014 school year. We have received Abington, Cheltenham, Jenkintown, Upper Moreland and Upper Dublin's dates. Springfield Township School District requires families to call and make an appointment to register. This information is available in your child's classroom. If your child is in a district not listed and you receive information regarding registration, please share it with your child's teacher.

January 23, 2013
Parent Conferences Scheduled for 2/18-2/22
Families will receive an invitation to their child's Winter Conference soon. Please respond to the invitation by accepting or rescheduling the appointment.

January 9, 2013
Study shows severe neglect can cause more harm

Study shows severe neglect can cause more harm to a young child’s development than overt physical abuse.

 

Young children who experience severe neglect bear the burdens of a range of adverse consequences, including cognitive delays, impairments in executive functioning, and disruptions of the body’s stress response, says a new Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. The Science of Neglect: The Persistent Absence of Responsive Care Disrupts the Developing Brain explains why severe neglect can cause more harm to a young child’s development than overt physical abuse, why neglect is so harmful in the earliest years of life, and why preventive efforts and effective interventions are so crucial in helping to ensure better long-term outcomes in learning, health, and parenting of the next generation.


The paper stresses the importance of the “serve and return” relationship between children and their parents or other caregivers in the family or community, where young children naturally reach out for interaction through babbling, facial expressions, gestures, and words, and adults respond with the same kind of vocalizing and gesturing back at them. This “serve and return” behavior continues back and forth to build the developing architecture of the brain which impacts later learning, behavior and health.

 
Also highlighted is the access to high-quality early care and education for children as action to address chronic under-stimulation, as well as intervention to assure caregiver responsiveness and address the developmental needs of the child in a familial context. The paper also calls for investing more in the development and implementation of evidence-based programs specifically designed to address the distinctive needs of children who are experiencing significant neglect.
Programs in Pennsylvania, such as Nurse-Family Partnership and Parent-Child Home Program work with at-risk families to build supports which prevent neglect and abuse.  In addition, programs such as PA Pre-K Counts, Keystone STARS and Head Start make available high quality early care and education to families.
 
-ABSTRACT-
 
The Science of Neglect: The Persistent Absence of Responsive Care Disrupts the Developing Brain
 
Extensive biological and developmental research over the past 30 years has generated substantial evidence that young children who experience severe deprivation or significant neglect—defined broadly as the ongoing disruption or significant absence of caregiver responsiveness—bear the burdens of a range of adverse consequences. Indeed, deprivation or neglect can cause more harm to a young child’s development than overt physical abuse, including subsequent cognitive delays, impairments in executive functioning, and disruptions of the body’s stress response. This Working Paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child explains why significant deprivation is so harmful in the earliest years of life and why effective interventions are likely to pay significant dividends in better long-term outcomes in learning, health, and parenting of the next generation.
 
Suggested citation: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. (2012). The Science of Neglect: The Persistent Absence of Responsive Care Disrupts the Developing Brain: Working Paper 12. www.developingchild.harvard.edu



Archives

 We had a great time at the pumpkin patch, both at Freddy Hill and in our own patch out back. 

Parents need to update their child's Emergency Contact forms this week.

Parent conferences are going well.